Archives for posts with tag: bash

Icons that are different sizes cause problems when you’re working on an app, but don’t want to spend multiple hours individually adjusting padding around each image. So I created a script that uses ImageMagick to size a batch of images to the same dimensions. To prevent clipping, I note the maximum width and height of each image in the batch before running the script, and supply this as my desired-size:

#!/bin/bash

# Name some args
FINALSIZE=$1

# Gotta have some parameters to continue
# First parameter should be image dimensions, i.e. contain 'x' in the middle.
if [ -z "$FINALSIZE" ] || [[ $FINALSIZE != *x* ]]; then
	if [[ $FINALSIZE != *x* ]]; then
		echo "desired-size not given!"
	fi
	echo "usage: normalizeicons.sh desired-size file [file2 ...]"
	echo "         desired-size: Desired image dimensions, e.g. 164x120"
	echo
	exit 1
fi

# Make sure we've got the magic butter
hash convert 2>/dev/null || { echo >&2 "MISSING convert COMMAND! INSTALL ImageMagick TO CONTINUE."; echo; exit 1; }

for INFILE in ${@:2}; do
	FILENAME=$(basename $INFILE)

	# Do the stuff
	# If your grays are fine, use this. Otherwise comment out, and use command below.
	convert $INFILE -background transparent -gravity center -extent $FINALSIZE $FILENAME

	# Sometimes this script messes up grays in your PNGs. If so, uncomment this:
	#convert $INFILE -define png:big-depth=16 -define png:color-type=6 -background transparent -gravity center -extent $FINALSIZE $FILENAME
done

Also on GitHub.

You could probably also modify this to find the correct dimensions based on the images you provide.

This script is meant for PNGs, but can easily be modified for any other image type, like a JPEG, by giving something other than transparent for the -background argument.

Known issues: I occasionally noticed that gray-colored icons got darker after running this script. After searching around, the commented-out convert line solved my problem. Utilizing it increases the file size slightly, but without a finer knowledge of PNGs, this was a quick and easy solution.

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Adding new image assets to our Android app is tedious. Since our designers target iOS first, there are a few things the Android team has to do when we get new graphics:

  1. Ensure graphics have valid file names (no hyphens, no unnecessary @2x in the name).
  2. Ensure similar graphics (e.g. icons in the drawer) are the same size.
  3. Provide the graphic at all possible densities.

I’ve created a script to speed up the renaming process. Before running it, I only copy the retina (…@2x…) graphics to my working directory, and then run it on my Mac or Linux machine:

#!/bin/bash

# Standardizes image file names to be usable as Android resources.

# Make sure we have some files to rename before continuing
if [ -z "$1" ]; then
	echo "usage: renamer.sh file [file2...]"
	echo
	exit 1
fi

for INFILE; do
	# Do the stuff
	if [ "$INFILE" != "${INFILE//-/_}" ]; then
		# Replace hyphens with underscores
		NEWFILE=${INFILE//-/_}
		mv -i "$INFILE" "$NEWFILE"
	else
		NEWFILE=$INFILE
	fi

	if [ "$NEWFILE" != "${NEWFILE//@2x/}" ]; then
		# Remove retina-ified filenames
		mv -i "$NEWFILE" "${NEWFILE//@2x/}"
	fi

	# Sanity check
	echo "Moved $INFILE to ${NEWFILE//@2x/}"
done

Also on GitHub.

This is useful for doing multiple images at once, e.g. renamer.sh icon-*.png, and, of course, it helps when you like the designer’s naming scheme.

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